Transfiguration (2020)
An ever-evolving walking figure

Transfiguration (2020) is a reworking of the Universal Everything studio classic from 2011, The Transfiguration. The Transfiguration was first shown at the studio’s first major solo exhibition Super-Computer Romantics at La Gaite Lyrique, Paris. Now completely remade using the latest procedural visual effects software, the updated CGI artwork brings new life to the ever-evolving walking figure, with a new foley-based soundtrack by Simon Pyke.

Transfiguration (2020) is held in the collection of Sifang Art Museum, Nanjing, Jiangsu, China.

Credits
Creative Director: Matt Pyke
Animation: Chris Perry
Sound Design: Simon Pyke

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′′Women who were called witches had no magic power, really. They simply could see things better.

They saw things of their time for what they were — because they were born with the ability, or the gift (or, perhaps, the curse) to have no filters on the eyes or on the mind — none of those filters we often carry around without an enemy realizing it, that .. our cultural conditioning tells us how we need to see things in order to be accepted, to seem right, to appear what we should be — to convince ourselves that we really are what we want to make appear.

But the witches didn't have it — because the consequence, or the cause, of their gift or curse was also this: to not fear loneliness, to not feel the need to fill their silence with empty chatter, to want something different from a role to play on the stage together with everyone.

That's why they were isolated. Alienated.

And that's why they were scary — how scary are those who tell the truth? And often you prefer to accuse them and destroy them .. so as to not even hear it, to not to want to even see it.

And that's why witches still exist today — and those who want to burn them exist as well.

We are witches when we ask ourselves difficult scary questions, when we want to understand. When we rebel against an unfair rule, when we reason with our own head. When we're not afraid to explore our shadows, our inner darkness, or admit our flaws, or confess all that we want.

We are witches — and even if you want to keep burning us — we are always here."

~Unknown

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′′Women who were called witches had no magic power, really. They simply could see things better.

They saw things of their time for what they were — because they were born with the ability, or the gift (or, perhaps, the curse) to have no filters on the eyes or on the mind — none of those filters we often carry around without an enemy realizing it, that .. our cultural conditioning tells us how we need to see things in order to be accepted, to seem right, to appear what we should be — to convince ourselves that we really are what we want to make appear.

But the witches didn't have it — because the consequence, or the cause, of their gift or curse was also this: to not fear loneliness, to not feel the need to fill their silence with empty chatter, to want something different from a role to play on the stage together with everyone.

That's why they were isolated. Alienated.

And that's why they were scary — how scary are those who tell the truth? And often you prefer to accuse them and destroy them .. so as to not even hear it, to not to want to even see it.

And that's why witches still exist today — and those who want to burn them exist as well.

We are witches when we ask ourselves difficult scary questions, when we want to understand. When we rebel against an unfair rule, when we reason with our own head. When we're not afraid to explore our shadows, our inner darkness, or admit our flaws, or confess all that we want.

We are witches — and even if you want to keep burning us — we are always here."

~Unknown



"There is perhaps a special danger in democratic abuses of power, namely, that being collective they are stimulated by mob hysteria. The man who has the art of arousing the witch-hunting instincts of the mob has a quite peculiar power for evil in a democracy where the habit of the exercise of power by the majority has produced that intoxication and impulse to tyranny which the exercise of authority almost invariably produces sooner or later. Against this danger, the chief protection is a sound education designed to combat the tendency to irrational eruptions of collective hate."

~ Bertrand Russell, Freedom and Colleges;
The American Mercury (Washington, D.C., May 1940)

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